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Dr Sarah Inskip

College Research Associate
College Research Associate
SpecialisationBioarchaeology
Research interestsThe analysis of past epidemics has significant potential to enhance our understanding of the present in addition to informing about the future. The Black Death, which killed between one quarter to half of the European population in the 14th century, was one of the most devastating epidemics known to humankind. However, much of our knowledge about the impact of the Black Death on the surviving and continuing population remains unclear, and very little is known about its immediate and long term biological consequences. By analysing human skeletons, which are direct sources of biological information, my research assesses whether there were significant changes in living conditions and health, as well as aspects of social identity. This will be achieved through an analysis of variation in diet, disease, physical activities, gender division, and population genetics between various communities of medieval Cambridge. My research will produce a novel perspective on the direct impact of this catastrophic event on an ordinary population of Cambridge, and advance our understanding of how epidemics can shape human health and society long after their occurrence. Outside this project I also undertake fieldwork at Saqqara, Egypt and at Jebel Qurma, Jordan.